Ivan Nahem's blog

When the Student Can Outdo the Teacher

So the genesis of this blog post is that Henrietta MacEwan posted an interesting question on this magazine’s Facebook page:

Can I just ask how would you handle a student coming in and asking you to help with pose that you cannot do? Many thanks.

So I realized that because I have lots of ideas about this, rather than writing a torturously long FB post, I could make it the scintillating, torturously longwinded blog post you have here! Anyway I want to continue the conversation, and would welcome others joining in.

Holding On

 

[Prefatory note: This post doesn’t have much to do with yoga, directly. It is just a meditation on our place and time. There are connections that can be made to yoga, in terms of “joining together,” in terms of ethical behavior of human beings to each other, but I just needed to focus on what has happened and how I feel about it, and I’m putting it here simply because I want to put it out there, this morning.]

Fred, or, Teaching Yoga to Veteran(s)

For a while now I’ve wanted to do some volunteer work with my yoga teaching. A couple years ago I trained with Connected Warriors but plans fell through for various reasons beyond my control (arrrg!) and I didn’t get on the roster till this year. However the first few times I was going to teach at the Brooklyn Veterans Centers there was no one showing up so it was cancelled.

Into It

 

This is somewhat about yoga but more about the concept of dhāraṇā, which, according to the Wiki gods, “may be translated as ‘holding’, ‘holding steady’, "concentration’ or ‘single focus.’”  You may know it as six up on Patanjali’s list of the eight ‘limbs’.

TEACHING RESTORATIVE

Actually I haven't taught restorative yoga, except for subbing, for a couple of years. But this Saturday I'm teaching teachers about teaching restorative, so I went back into my archives. I found this essay I wrote a few years ago, and it seemed like it might make a decent enough blog post for the magazine...

Home set-up.

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